Flying and Dehydration

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Plenty of us go on holidays whenever we can afford the time and expenses, and flying is the best way to get around. Most of us would have noticed ourselves getting a little dry mouthed and thirsty while inside the air cabin, and I usually need to ask for an extra orange juice or two to keep me feeling good. The reason for this is that the cabin is low in humidity and so can cause mild signs of dehydration in most passengers. 

Cabin air humidty often range from 10-20% but can get lower. To give you an idea of how dry that is, the Sahara desert is usually around 25%, and the average humidity in a house ranges from 30-50%. Its not a drastic situation, but it is important to be aware of the effects this could have on your body. Symptoms can range from dry mouths, dry skin and eyes to fatigue and elevated stress levels. 

Another fact is that our defenses against diseases are comprised because of the dry air. Our normally moist throats and nasal passages can trap bacteria. Also, the air is recycled and is being shared by a hundred other people for however long the flight is. 

A simple solution to this is to pick up a bottle of water after going through the security screening (security will confiscate bottles of liquid). It might be a good idea to have some moisturiser on you as well for your skin (within the limits allowed through security). Drink plenty during the flight, and when you arrive at your destination. Also remember to walk around every once in a while, just to get the blood circulating. On most flights Ill get up and stretch a bit, my legs get so sore after a while! 

So remember next time you take a plane, drink a little extra water while your on board and keep yourself hydrated!

Some links: Cabin Humidity, Flight Attendant’s Tips

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